Places of interest Augsburg city

Golden hall

City Hall and Golden Hall

The City Hall that was built by Elias Holl between 1615 to 1620 is the landmark of the city and it is also said to be the most significant secular Renaissance building north of the Alps. The restored Golden Hall is famous for its magnificent, pompous portals, coffered ceiling and mural paintings. Open from 10 a. m. to 6 p.m. except when there are private events.

 

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Perlach tower

Perlach Tower

The Perlach Tower next to the City Hall offers a spectacular panoramic view of Augsburg. Open from May to October.

 

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Fuggerei

Fuggerei

Founded in 1521 by Jacob Fugger the Rich for industrious, innocently impoverished Augsburg citizens of Roman Catholic faith. The world’s oldest social housing: it encompasses 67 houses with 140 council flats. The annual rent is 1 Rhenish gulden (an equivalent of 1 euro). In the Fuggerei museum original furnishings are exhibited.

 

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www.fugger.de

The cathedral

The Cathedral

Romanesque and Gothic St. Mary’s Cathedral with impressive frescos, a Romanesque crypt, windows from the 12th century displaying the prophets as well as four panel paintings by Hans Holbein the Elder. Many finds from the Roman era to be seen on the square.

 

Wikipedia

www.bistum-augsburg.de

Magnificent fountains

The three magnificent fountains

From around 1600 in Maximilianstrasse – also known as "The Imperial Mile," there are splendid fountain monuments and precious bronze sculptures: Augustus Fountain, Mercury fountain and Hercules Fountain.

The Fugger City Palace

The Fugger City Palace

The residential and business house of Jacob Fugger was built from 1512 to 1515 and has charming and attractive inner courts (the Damenhof or Ladies’ Court) built in the architectural style of the Italian Renaissance. Access by Maximilianstrasse 36.

 

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Schaezler Palace

Schaezler Palace

City residence of the banker Liebert von Liebenhofen with a richly furnished rococo banqueting hall (1765-1770), today Germany’s most important baroque gallery. Entrance to the State Gallery of Bavaria with paintings by the Old Masters such as Duerer, Holbein and Cranach.

St. Ulrich’s churches

St. Ulrich’s churches

Catholic St. Ulrich’s church: a richly furnished late Gothic basilica built in the architectural styles of Renaissance and Baroque. Tomb of the diocesan saints Afra, Saint Ulrich and Simpert. Protestant St. Ulrich’s church (in the foreground): Impressive stucco ceiling with ornamental art from the Regency period.

 

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St. Anna church

St. Anna church

Formerly a Carmelite monastery, a Protestant church since 1525 (the so-called “Lutherstiege”). The tomb chapel of the Fugger family is regarded as the first Renaissance church building in Germany. It features valuable paintings by Lucas Cranach and the Goldsmith’s Chapel with 14th century frescos. Right next to the Annahof is the City Market, with its picturesque selection of flowers, fruit and vegetables, bread, cakes and pastries, meat, fish and lots more.

 

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The Synagogue

The Synagogue

Built by Heinrich Lömpel and Fritz Landauer from 1914 to 1917 as cupola building with Art Nouveau furnishing. Moreover, it is home of the Museum of Jewish Culture.

 

www.jkmas.de

Augsburg Puppenkiste

Augsburg Puppenkiste (Puppet Theatre)

”Die Kiste,” the museum of the Augsburg Puppet Theatre, is found one floor above the theater in the Heilig-Geist-Spital, a former hospital now preserved as an historical monument. In addition to the display of the well-loved marionettes, the museum also presents the history of the theatre.

 

Wikipedia

www.augsburger-puppenkiste.de